Thursday, January 23, 2020

Floaters


Keeping the kiddos in class is more of a challenge at the continuation high school. They will take any excuse to roam the campus.

Tuesday I covered the computer class. And every period at least one boy took forever to use the restroom. It's a small campus, so they didn't have far to go. Yet, 20 minutes, 30 minutes they were gone for.

Students who abuse the liberal restroom policy get placed on a "floaters" list. They lose the privilege of going during class time. So, I note those who disappear for half a period, because they probably don't do it with just me.

(I even had a student disappear for ten minutes when he stepped outside to blow his nose. I got up to find out where he went, and he was sitting at a bench outside, chatting up a couple girls. When I got him back inside, he needed to go next door to return the restroom pass to that teacher--he had borrowed it the previous period. That took another five minutes.)

Third period ended at 11:03 AM. At 10:58, a student walked in. He had a pass from the counseling office.

Students frequently need to speak with the counselor or the principal. If they're kept, they have a pass. I don't mark them tardy if they have one of these passes as they have an excused reason.

As per normal, there was a time marked on the pass. 10:15 AM.

10:15??? He left the counseling office at 10:15?

I could see the counseling office door from my classroom. It's about as far away as the restrooms. It does not take 45 minutes to get from one to the other. Walking at a good pace, it shouldn't even take a full minute.

Just to check, I called the counselor. It took her a minute to realize who I was talking about (that's how long it had been since he'd been there). She verified he left her office at 10:15.

Well, I know what to do with that...

I went to the attendance clerk. I gave her the pass and told her this story. She shook her head, and then pulled up his attendance record on her computer. She encoded it as a "cut" for the period. She even gets a little box to write an explanation, so she wrote that in.

Because, seriously...

19 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. They do. They don't get how often I've been to that school and how well the office staff knows me (and how well I know their procedures).

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  2. The stuff you have to deal with...!

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  3. Really? 20-30 minutes to use the restroom? Do they think you were born yesterday? Good that you are on to them and keep track of the things that you do!

    betty

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  4. I know that through the years teachers have been dealing with this sort of stuff....BUT kids seem to have gotten a tad bolder! When I was in school, you did bathroom break between classes.

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    1. Ah, but the schools have been sued over allowing the kiddos to use the restroom when the need arises during class time.

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    2. wow....they might have been there and done that here also but with no kids in schools I am not up on that stuff.

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    3. Yeah, it was an issue, I'm not sure when it really hit. Now when teachers refuse passes, the kiddos get all upset and angry and threaten calling parents and such. It can get ugly.

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  5. It takes so much energy to catch someone in a lie. But I'm glad you have the wherewithal to do it. It probably helps that you get paid to do it.

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  6. Love that they don't think you can tell time. But I guess that's why they're at the continuation high. They're behaviour hasn't changed, and sadly it probably means their work ethic won't change after school either.

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  7. I hope AJ is wrong, at least for the most part, about behaviour issues. It's something I mentioned before, but I have fond memories of strolling the halls with a fellow student(and cute guy!) suffering from diabetes back in 1986 or so. The teacher adored us and let it slide when we spent twenty minutes finding him a supposed snack. :) But I would have at least tried to concoct something plausible before turning in the pass (I suppose it's impossible to forge the time in a convincing manner). Ah, the young. Be well!

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    1. He didn't even try to forge the time. 20 minutes is one thing; 45 quite another.

      The thing about behavior is that some of them do grow up. I'm often astonished by students who I had run ins with in the past who are suddenly, gasp, model citizens. They work. They're nice. I have no issues with them. It just happens sometimes, so no, they're not lost causes.

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  8. Well, they have to try. Gotta test you, after all. ;)

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