Thursday, February 14, 2019

Missed It


It was one of those lovely days that I don't write about. Ceramics. The kiddos were pretty much on task, and my biggest concern was staying awake.

At the end of the period, they went to the sinks to wash the clay off their hands. I was seated next to one. I happened to look over as one boy was washing his hands...

I've been subbing a while. I knew this boy. I'd had him in class several times in the past. He's never made the blog before. He does his work, mostly. He's never been rude to me. He's like 75% of the students I encounter. (Yes, mostly the kiddos are pretty good.)

Anyway, I looked over and noticed... The boy had no thumb on one of his hands. (I think it was the right hand, but at this point I don't recall precisely.)

And all I could think was: how had I never noticed this before?

This boy's a senior. I've probably had him in classes for five years, if not six. I've passed him as I do class walk arounds. I've passed papers to him and had him pass papers back to me. I've called his name on the roll (or asked his name as I did a reverse roll call).

And I never noticed?

Wow. I really need to be paying better attention.

13 comments:

  1. That's something you don't see every day! Don't worry, I probably would've missed it as well.

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  2. Maybe a few blog post on those great and caring student. I believe most people has fine spirits about them.
    Coffee is on

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  3. I don't notice things like that all the time. It's because they're used to it and know how to do things without their missing digits, so they look completely natural, and you don't pick up on it.

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  4. I can imagine the non-problematic kids get less of an eye directed at them.

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  5. He probably had adapted so well to his "disability" that he "functioned" as "normal" therefore you didn't catch the anomaly. Son went to school with a friend who had nonfunctional arms basically would be a way to say it. Hardly any fingers and short arms, but boy could that kid do anything. Played the trombone with his feet, raced remote control cars, drove, etc. I often "forgot" his "disabilities" because he turned them into abilities.

    betty

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  6. I actually think that's swell since he might be bugged because of it or asked questions. You might be one of the few who never gave it a second thought(because you never noticed until now).

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    1. I didn't question it then, either. I figure it's rude to bring it up unless it has direct bearing on the conversation at hand. And he brings it up first.

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  7. I was thinking like Betty. ~nods~ I have a friend (aged 45) who suffers joint/limb deformities and severe, lifetime chronic pain due to juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. He's amazing, always pushing himself because he wants to make the most of this life while he has it. Doctors and therapists are always amazed.

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    Replies
    1. Kiddos with such things tend to have figured out how to work around them. It's amazing what one can get used to.

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  8. It shows how capable he is at the everyday. I remember when my youngest Barbarian played basketball and at about the 5th game of the season I suddenly realised one of his team mates only had a stump for his right hand. I'd helped at training, had thrown the ball to this kid and had it thrown back at me and never noticed. But he was one of the top players on the team and went on to become a first grade player. He never used it as an excuse or even mentioned it. He just got on.

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