Wednesday, May 9, 2018

Test Ready


Integrated math 2. (Read: geometry or 10th grade math.) It was test day and we were on block schedule. They had an hour of review followed by an hour for the test.

During the testing hour, a boy called me over. He had a question about one of the test questions...

This was not the exact test question, but it is a good example of what the test question was like.
"How do you find that angle?"

Me: "Uh huh. Yeah. That's what the question is asking."

"But how do you do it?"

During the review hour, they had a test review packet to complete. They were given 10 minutes to work on a page, then the teacher (it was a co-teaching situation, so I took the support role) demonstrated the questions via the projector. And there was more than one example of this type of problem on the review.

How had the boy missed it? Well...

During that first hour, I ended up stationed at his table. I was trying (unsuccessfully) to get them to put away a phone. They wouldn't. They wanted to watch a baseball game. "We know the material. We're ready for the test. We all have As and Bs in this class."

Apparently they weren't as ready as they thought they were.

And I took a certain amount of satisfaction from the fact that the boy was going to miss that question. Does that make me a bad person?

(In case you're wondering, it's a sine/cosine/tangent question. Take the ratio of two sides, look up that decimal on a table that they had, and voila. If you want more details, I'll explain in the comments.)

23 comments:

  1. Let's hope he took it as a learning experience that perhaps next time the phone should go away and the review packet be given more time and consideration. Wonder if he got an A or B on the test :)

    betty

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  2. Hi Liz - those were long ago days!! I still can't believe they're allowed phones in class ... ah well - cheers Hilary

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  3. I don't blame you for feeling that way. And maybe it's a good lesson for him. Be well!

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  4. Hi Liz,
    That must have been quite a challenge. Even I am wondering how the phone was allowed in the class. I am sure you tried your best to get the student to answer the question. So, you shouldn't feel bad.
    Take care,
    Pradeep
    http://bit.ly/TT_A2Z_Reflections

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    1. It wasn't actually allowed. I could have taken it away from them, but I wasn't in the mood for the howling that would have followed.

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  5. Ah yes, to think they know it all and then realize that they actually don't. Maybe the little shock will help him realize that he should pay attention more.

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    1. We can hope. And he's young enough that the lesson could take.

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  6. That's what he gets for being overconfident. And lazy.

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  7. Wow, I am having some horrible geometry flashbacks right now. Shudder.

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  8. Those phones in the class would be a really sore spot with me. I suck at geometry.

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  9. I would feel a bit of sweet revenge, I'm not sorry to say. I'm glad I no longer need to know how to solve a math problem like that. lol

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  10. The Barbarians' high school has banned phones during class time (although they still have the chromebooks, but they should only have them out if requested by the teacher).

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  11. It's called your reap what you sew. And I don't feel the least bit sorry for him. Phones in school indeed! Pffft!

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  12. I have to say it just seems like yesterday that school started back.....time flies when you don't have to go in there and teach..haha

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    1. And we're almost to the end of the school year. Time flies, indeed.

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  13. I don't think it makes you a bad person. He made a decision.

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    1. He did. Hopefully he sees it that way...

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  14. LOL makes your eye twitch a little. Oh well for him.

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  15. This is the story of my life as a teacher. They should all get a masters degree on the ability to appear as though they are listening when they aren't.

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    1. I often ask classes if their teacher warned them they'd be out. Someone always says no. And then that student is reminded that the teacher did, in fact, say they were going to be out, where they were going, and what they'd be doing on the teacher's absence. And the student just stares blankly back. They generally admit they weren't paying attention.

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