Tuesday, July 16, 2019

Denied Access


At the heart of much speculative fiction (and fiction in general) is a question. What if? On Tuesdays I like to throw one out there and see what you make of it. Do with it as you please. If a for-instance is not specified, feel free to interpret that instance as you wish. And if you find this becomes a novel-length answer, I'd appreciate a thank you in the acknowledgements. 😉

What if the big pharma execs who are gouging drug prices (insulin prices!) could be tried for murder? Or, at least what if they could be held liable for all the lives damaged due to their reckless endangerment?

19 comments:

  1. That would be interesting. Regarding insulin, you can get it "cheap" at Wal-Mart. When we had our dog, he developed diabetes and needed insulin. We got it at the local CVS or Walgreens but someone told us about Wal-Mart and it was 25% cheaper than those stores. And if I remember correctly, we didn't need a prescription like we did at the other places. Seems weird not needing one. Anyway, supposedly they charge so much for the medicines because of years of developing them, etc., etc., etc., but the meds are so ridiculously expensive and I think that's why a lot of people buy their meds from Canada. Lucrative business healthcare!

    betty

    ReplyDelete
  2. We had a diabetic cat and also got our insulin cheap at Walmart.

    It is criminal what they charge - and there's a lot of things that jack up the prices besides just greed - but trying them for murder would set a very dangerous precedent.

    ReplyDelete
  3. They also helped spark the life destroying drug war and have kept beneficial psychedelics out of the hands of researchers. Grrr... Sufferers from various ailments will benefit if these chemicals are ever made widely available. Be well!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's like doing this for profit may be a bad idea...

      Delete
  4. I'd laaaaaaaaaugh. I'd definitely call it a day to celebrate. That's what should be happening.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I say...Good! It is disgusting that medicine we get covered under any health care plan is so much cheaper than what people in the states have to pay. They are benefiting from peoples' health misfortune and they should be tried and charged. Too bad it will never happen. You should watch Bulworth

    ReplyDelete
  6. One could only hope for that day when they get their day in court.

    ReplyDelete
  7. What a wonderful world this would be if that could be.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Be nice but I also think that if it came to that a lot of drug makers would stop making the drugs needed if they are being held in accordance! Personally if they would make oils and other stuff where it could be added to our insurance I would go that way. Just can't afford all that. Plus, I would need a vat of stuff to dip into for my pain...haha

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's the other side, but I'm talking about insulin which has been the same formulation for a while. What suddenly got so expensive? I'm thinking the third home needed upgrades...

      Delete
  9. I think that would be a good thing.

    ReplyDelete
  10. That would be nice. And also kind of scary. Where does it stop? At what limit is "charging too much" a crime? At what point is "affecting lives" an issue? Great food for thought question today!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. How do they price their drugs? We all understand making back investment money in product. If they can explain what's costing so much, perhaps we'd understand.

      Delete
  11. I'm all for the free market, but.....what some drug companies do is reprehensible.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I live in Vietnam and take an aggressive drug for my arthritis. In the States AFTER my insurance, I was paying a little over $180/month for this drug.

    Here, I walk into a local pharmacy (without a prescription) and pay about $12 for a three month supply.

    The idea that they have to cost so much because of the research and development is BS. If that was true, then they would be costly everywhere.

    I totally agree that the people upcharging are immoral. However, charging them with a crime opens the door to severe legal abuse. Where is the line? If that could be done with pharmaceuticals, then why not food as well. Water, building supplies, clothing, school supplies, required college textbooks, safety equipment, etc.

    And where is the definitive line that will determine when it is criminal and when it is not? I just think the issue is too complex and hands more control to the government over personal lives.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Courts would adjudicate at that point. Slippery slope is an interesting argument as the question becomes would we take advantage? How do we get big pharma to stop taking advantage?

    ReplyDelete

I appreciate your comments.

I respond to comments via email, unless your profile email is not enabled. Then, I'll reply in the comment thread. Eventually. Probably.