Friday, March 8, 2019

So Fire


ASB (read: student leadership). I was supposed to cover three days, but I got pulled for one of them.

They were "working in committees", which meant they were treating the time as free. (They were going to be graded on what they had accomplished when the teacher returned, so if they weren't done, they'll regret not doing anything then.)

Second period, talk turned to prom. They were debating the merits of a party bus over a limo. (Apparently driving oneself is not done.)

"The party bus was so fire," the girl said. Apparently her friend's family owns one (the company?).

Then the talk was on where to go eat before. Certain places were "fire" while others weren't.

Yup. Fire. That was the word they kept using. And through context, I was able to figure out that "fire" means good. Really good. Probably what my generation would have called "rad" or "awesome".

Consider yourself up on the current lingo 😉

26 comments:

  1. I remember in college the term everyone was using was tight. It's weird the words that get chosen to mean good.

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    1. Tight makes my teeth hurt. That and sweet. I'm not sure why they annoyed me so.

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  2. Well that's really groovy or neato...what I said when I was a kid

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  3. Thanks for that ... I'd never have known! Ah well ... have a good weekend - cheers Hilary

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  4. Funny, people my age used to say "chill".

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  5. HAHA.....using that word fire is just groovy! Cool man, cool. HAHA....and this too will pass.

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    1. Only to return later down the road....except groovy, I think..

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  6. I just learned the "lit" word. We said groovy and cool! That was the 60's

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    1. Oh man... Yup, that party was lit. I'm very familiar with that one.

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  7. Haven't heard my teens using that yet. They still use "cool" (so, total opposite *grin*).

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  8. That's a new one with fire. Hadn't heard that, not that I'm exposed to a lot of teens. You do wonder though who can afford prom these days between the party bus or the limo and then eating at the places they go to.

    betty

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  9. Thanks for that! When the lingo makes it to the east coast or the kids I watch get caught up with the times, I'll know what they are saying!

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    1. I think you take care of much younger, right? By the time it makes it to you, it'll be a different word, I'd wager.

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  10. Thanks! Very helpful. Wow, "rad" really is a blast from the past.

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  11. My son is an adult now, so I am totally out of the loop. Thanks!

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    1. It's nice to be out of the loop. One doesn't want to hear "you're so extra" with that teen eye roll...

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  12. My generation was groovy, hot, cool, big, cookin'...just about all. I heard my gr-daughter said "Fire" and she told me what it meant. I will have to learn other words now and use them with the elderly in the community. That will really confuse them.

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    1. Well, "lit" means that something is going well, like, "This party is lit". Basic is an insult. Someone who is kind of boring and ordinary. Extra is the opposite, someone who is over the top. Can be a compliment, but usually it's an insult.

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  13. It's so funny how generations come up with new terms. "Lit" is another one that means really awesome.

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  14. I wonder how "fire" got started. Would they think a fire was fire?

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