Tuesday, August 16, 2022

Uneducated

Speculative fiction has a long history of taking the issues of the day and reframing them in a new context with the hope that people will look at them in a new way. Our "unprecedented" times are bringing all sorts of old ways and old thinking back to the forefront. On Tuesdays, I present "what if?" questions. Previously, the intent was as an idea generator. It still is. But now, I ask that you really think about all the repercussions that these ideas will have. If only these were just thought exercises. 

As school begins for the year for us...

What if they did away with public schools? (And did what? Either just left a child's education up to their family or turning all schools into private and/or charter schools.)

16 comments:

  1. That would be awful! If we didn't have public schools, funding would have to come from the private sector, meaning, most likely, that parents would be paying for the teacher salaries, building maintenance, and supplies. That's tough to budget for a lot of families (think at least 10K per year), so having the option for "free" public education is a good thing.

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    1. It is. Lately, I hear all the complaints about public schools, so I thought I'd throw this question out there.

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  2. Conservatives would be happy because only the people they think deserve education (the rich) would be educated.

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  3. Well, that would suck all around. I bet schools would be set up all around just like the speakeasys from the 20s.

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    1. Making schools illegal is a whole 'nother question... Although, it's a good question. I might have to use it one of these days...

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  4. That would be unfortunate for many children. Not all parents can afford a private education, and many wouldn't want to school their children themselves, and others are not qualified to teach. By "qualified" I don't mean they need to be certified teachers or college graduates. There are plenty of resources out there to enable families to successfully home school. However, working parents and young children aren't a good match for that. I home schooled my oldest from 8th grade up (although he went to community college during the same time frame), and my youngest from K-middle school for one (she went to high school for 9th, half of 10th, then took the CHSPE), the youngest K to graduation, (but for a few weeks in middle school).
    People that complain need to put their time where their mouths are. It's not just money, it's the parents involvement.

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    1. Oh yes, there is so much that goes into an education. It's doable for parents, but it is a big time and energy commitment. There's a reason why most people outsource it.

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  5. I know a certain political party that would love nothing better than to eliminate public schools. So then what? Many people can't afford private schools. Some just aren't qualified to teach (and I mean that in the way that Lisa meant.) My son was homeschooled by my husband for three years in middle school/first year of high school, while husband worked part time (as you told Lisa, it's a big time and energy commitment) and I worked full time and homeschooled part time. It was also a most interesting experience. I've never regretted doing it. We did it in New York State, which may be one of the strictest as far as reporting and testing requirements (at least back then) and I did all the record keeping, hunting down resources, and library visits. What it also did was give me the deepest respect for professional teachers, not that I didn't respect them before the experience.

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    1. Yeah, it's hard. I can't even imagine. I know my district has resources to help families that homeschool. I don't know if everyone has such a resource.

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  6. Someone “loves the poorly educated”. That’s the danger, people who haven’t been taught critical thinking are going to follow a politician who makes absurd promises and tells them what they want to hear.

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    1. I once read something by an American who taught English in North Korea. And this person had the worst time teaching them to write argumentative essays. They didn't know how to argue facts. It was fascinating (and very scary).

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  7. I think charter schools would be a bad idea. It would benefit the rich worse than public education already does, but the way public schools are going, tending to the emotional needs more than the educational needs of the students, is not giving them an education either.

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    1. Emotional support is necessary if one wants the students to absorb the information. They should work in tandem. Hopefully. Ideally, the emotional support would happen at home. Sadly, it doesn't always.

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  8. I would never want public schools abolished. Omitting our federal government's oversight, however, makes sense to me. Individual state funding, local school board elections, and options open to individuals should not be precluded by national politics.

    By the way, I dreamed of providing emotional support to coworkers last night. It's weird, since I'm out of the job market. But maybe I should pursue an avenue to help folks.

    :D

    Be well!

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    1. There are many places that could use volunteers. Perhaps that's where you'd do the most good.

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  9. Our democracy over should that happen. I really can’t see that happening.

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I appreciate your comments.

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