Monday, May 11, 2015

Feigning Innocence


Monday morning. 7th grade math. From the lesson plan, I could tell that the teacher had been out the previous Friday. How? Because for 5th period I was to send two students out with standards for not listening to the sub.

Easy enough.

5th period arrived. I got the class started, took roll, and then I went to find the delinquents. They were easy enough to find. They sat next to each other.

I explained that they had standards to write and I told them which room they were to go to. (The teacher had been specific.) One put up a brief argument, but readily accepted his fate. The other protested his innocence.

Could he have been innocent? It's possible. The seating chart wasn't accurate, and students do lie about their names. (They're not really good at it, though.) But that wasn't my concern. He was going out whether he liked it or not.

The first boy was sent to Ms. T. They're all afraid of Ms. T. She's tough. But after his initial protest, he left and I did not see him again.

The second boy... He returned to class three times. The first time was the are-you-serious? return. Sometimes if they beg hard enough, a sub will relent and let them stay. (Not me, but I learned this lesson the hard way.) The second time... I'm not sure why he came back the second time. The third time he returned was because he couldn't find the room I was sending him to. (I had to explain how to get there. I'd subbed in the room so I knew where it was.)

But the third time was the charm. He did not return again.

Still, I felt that little episode deserved a mention in the note.

I'm also over at Unicorn Bell this week. I'd love it if you stopped by and said, "Hi".

20 comments:

  1. Not sure his story about not finding the classroom was innocent either.

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  2. I like how you just up and call them delinquents. It's like a little warm and fuzzy nickname.

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  3. Yeah, definitely "scam the sub!" You can't be fooled.

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    1. Oh, I can be fooled. But I have a little more experience with the games than he has.

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  4. He kept coming back in case this time you would get tired of fighting and let him stay.

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  5. I guess his motto was "if at first you don't succeed, try, try, again". At least he eventually got the message that he was not to remain in that class.

    betty

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  6. Was the one that you thought might be innocent the one that kept returning? My hat is off to you as a teacher

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    1. Short answer: yes. Although, I don't really think he's innocent. While it may be possible, I kind of doubt it.

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    2. Feigning innocence - what teenagers do best!

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  7. I’m not quite sure why being sent out of a math class is a punishment. Wouldn’t it be more effective to perhaps give them an additional math assignment?

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  8. It's always amazing how persistent kids can be about their innocence, even when they're totally guilty. Lynda makes a good point tho, an additional math assignment might be a great deterrent...

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  9. I wonder if they do the return thing to save face? It wouldn't seem to work. If they were really unbothered by detention the way cool kids are supposed to be, they'd just go do it.

    So maybe these were more or less good kids who'd tried to take advantage and were now remorseful.

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    1. In a substitute training session once, a teacher explained that middle schoolers must drag their feet as a way of saving face. By complying, they're showing us that they're "good kids". But by dragging their feet, they're showing their peers that they're "cool". Don't know if I buy it, but it's what they do.

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  10. I don't know how you deal with all of those teens all the time. I'd want to pull out my hair and bang my head against the teacher's desk. I'm sure the students would love that. Haha!

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    1. Not all of them are that frustrating. I actually just had two periods of silence (well, almost). The good periods make up for the bad.

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  11. I am not sure if I knew before today that you have links to definitions of frequently used terms in your blog. I didn't know what standards were but now I do. I would have hated that... We just had class assignments and free reading time when sent to ISP. Although I think it might have been answer every question instead of every other.

    I really don't understand that student that kept coming back to the room.

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  12. The "I didn't do, I'm innocent" routine wears thin. The tough teacher seems to be the way to be when you are a full time teacher

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  13. Can't believe he actually came back to try and argue to be let off! So cheeky!!

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