Thursday, August 24, 2017

Looking It Up


It was Friday in the 12th grade English class at the continuation high school. Since most of the kiddos who end up at this school aren't terribly academically inclined, any excuse not to work is taken. And Friday is enough of an excuse. So, most teachers use it as a make up work day.

The class is reading The Crucible. They are given time each day to answer questions that go along with the play, but of course many of them are behind. So, their task for the day was to get caught up.

Second period whined, of course. Not only was the play hard to understand, it was boring as well.

After suffering through them giving me that look while I tried to talk up the play, I left them to their own devices...

And the phones came out.

I wasn't surprised. I walked around the room, peeking at papers while looking over shoulders. And I noticed something surprising on the students' phones.

Usually I see Instagram or texting or music apps or such. Videos have become popular of late. And games are always around. But that's not what I saw.

They were looking for the answers to the questions.

Yup, their phones were on CliffNotes or SparkNotes and the like. They Googled the questions on the assignment.

(I frequently see students Google the questions on their assignments rather than looking for them in the book. On the one hand, I'd rather they use the books to find the answers as the teacher intended. But on the other hand, being able to glean information from the internet is the future of figuring things out.)

At least they were on task, and on a Friday. Win?

23 comments:

  1. Hi Liz - I reckon so ... at least they were interested enough to look things up ... cheers Hilary

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  2. Win. As long as they get answers from legit sources.

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    1. Dubious. Although, depends on what you consider legit.

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  3. Oh wow! I'm surprised they weren't slacking off fully but they actually tried to find the answers hahaha that works I guess

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    1. Yeah, I was shocked to find them looking up resources rather than texting.

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  4. I was initially all ready to moan about kids cheating. Then I read what you said about the Internet and thought, "Hmmmmmm, she makes a good point."
    In any case, those kids better stay off my lawn.

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  5. They really were left to their own devices, right? :P

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  6. WOW....there are still surprises out there I guess.

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  7. Replies
    1. Especially at that school. I'm more likely to get sleepers than workers.

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  8. I wish they would be interested in a book but, Hey< they were looking up info on the book which is great. A good day for juvenile delinquents

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    1. You can't really convince them that reading is a good thing most of the time. And The Crucible... I get it. Important to study, but kinda tedious.

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  9. There is the movie... with Daniel Day Lewis. I love that play. You could use an analogy and ask them to imagine that everyone who uses their phone in class is accused of witchcraft.

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    1. They've seen the movie. And their teacher does all the setup stuff, going through the history as well as the witchcraft accusery stuff. Going in cold, it was hard to come up with something that they hadn't heard before.

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  10. It's a fascinating topic, but I can see how they would be bored reading it. Too bad teachers couldn't substitute Jodie Picoult's Salem Falls.

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  11. Great play I reckon. I am already sharing these little cheats with my grandie. Answers by any means I call it. Good ol' fridays huh?

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    1. I don't recommend the whole "google the entire question" thing, but so many of them do it. And find the answers, too.

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  12. That's awesome that the problem was that they really didn't understood the book and were trying to get help figuring it out. I just love Google/cliff notes sometimes. :)

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    1. Yeah, I'm totally good with them looking for resources to help.

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