Friday, October 23, 2015

The Rules


Middle school special ed science class. On a Friday. They had a test. Open book.

A student raised his hand. I went over to answer his question...

The instructional aide then informed me of the testing rules. If the kiddos had a question, they were to come to us.

This is an unusual arrangement, so she explained. They tend to be needy during tests, so if we go to them, they'll need us to stand by them the entire time they're working. (Apparently they've learned this through experience.) The making them come to us is one way they're trying to get them to think for themselves.

We still got questions. Lots of them. And every time they raised their hands, I had to motion to them to come to me. I guess it's a process.

Some of them did very well on the test. (The IA graded most of the papers that day.) Some, not so much. But I guess that's normal.

26 comments:

  1. I can see also too that this would help them be self sufficient; coming to others for help. I was a teacher's aide years ago in high school; I loved grading papers :)

    betty

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    1. It's kind of hard to grade papers if you constantly have to get up to "help" students. I bet the grading was fun.

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  2. That is an odd way of doing it, but I can see how it might encourage independence.

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    1. It's different. But many classrooms have unique rules.

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  3. That is unusual, but at least you all got through it.

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  4. Yeah, I see how that would work. If you come to them, they might want you to look over their shoulder the entire time.

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  5. Interesting and the process of self survival can be learned this way. I learned from you just by this post.

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    1. It was interesting to me that they would have to limit their questions in this way. But then again, I could see why.

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  6. That is new to me but it does make sense since some would ask a lot if they didn't have to get up to do it.

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  7. A different technique to help them but I can see the point.

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    1. Yeah, me too once it was explained.

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  8. I'm surprised that some students prefer their teacher to "hover" while they're taking an exam. I don't think I'd be able to concentrate very well in that situation.

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    1. Special ed. They're pretty needy during tests.

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  9. What a varied week you have Liz. Gotta say that your experiences sound more controlled than many I had in central London where things often kicked off. Sweeties and reading the texts aloud in funny voices helped tho.

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    1. Oh, I've got other stories as well. Like the time I got hit by a flying math book...

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  10. I remember my mom making me do things when I was a kid, like ask an adult for something instead of her doing it, so I'd be more comfortable and less dependent on her. And that's what we want, for the kids to become independent of us, the adults. Sounds like a good way of doing things.

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  11. I can see that. I once volunteered as a student to help in a special ed class and they really do get you to stick around next to them during the whole assignment.

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  12. I can see that. I once volunteered as a student to help in a special ed class and they really do get you to stick around next to them during the whole assignment.

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  13. I'm glad some did well on the test despite the rules. I hope you're enjoying substitute teaching!

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  14. It’s great the class did well on the exam, but so many rules (and tests)!

    VR Barkowski

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