Thursday, May 19, 2022

Buttoned Up

There is software that the school uses for lessons for the students. It's geared towards their level, understanding-wise and age-wise. That is, the words and sentences are very simple, but the topics are geared towards adults learning to navigate the world.

This month's topic is laundry.

They actually do laundry. We have a washer and dryer on campus, and they'll assist in washing towels and such. 

On this particular Tuesday, the story we read had to do with not throwing away clothes that can be fixed. The character in the story was taught that she could treat stained clothes, have pants hemmed, and replace a button on a blouse. 

When we got to that point, I asked the students if they knew how to sew on a button. They did not. 

And now I had a lesson for them. 

Vera is a seasoned sewer, so I asked her if she had the materials to sew on a button. She did, and she brought them the next day. 

I was not expecting them to become expert button-sewers. I have done a couple crafty-type things with them, and they have a hard time. But the point of the story was that sewing on a button was doable, so I wanted them to at least have a go at doing it. 

And they managed it. It took a while. I don't think they'd be able to repeat it without help. (If I was the permanent teacher, button sewing would be part of the curriculum every time the laundry unit rolled around.) 


In the second image, we had to cut the thread as Jennifer had gone around the fabric rather than over and under it. Definitely a good first attempt.

It's something we would have spent a lot more time on if I was seeking mastery. But a lot of what we do with them is for introduction and so they know it's possible. So, by that standard, it was a success. 

14 comments:

  1. My button sewing skill is subpar, to be polite.

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  2. Good job. This is a lesson they'll find lots of use for.

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  3. My sewing skills? It’s called “paying the tailor”.

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  4. I use to rip off buttons and I had to sew them on. This happen back in grade school
    Coffee is on and stay safe

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  5. Hi Liz - yes I can see it'd be a good example and they succeed ... interesting to read about - thanks - Hilary

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  6. I think it is a great idea. I know my boys have difficulty with fine motor skills and need to do more than use their fingers to play video games.

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    1. I'd do more of this, but they do struggle, so I space out the more difficult type of projects.

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  7. Excellent job with this, and I know you wouldn't be surprised at some of the other life skills your students don't have - because no one ever bothered to teach them. Because no one thought of it. Your state does a good job as far as keeping them in school until age 22. Many states (including mine) don't.

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    1. Oh, I know they don't teach any of this even to the general ed population.

      Yeah, special ed students can remain in school until age 21. It helps those that can get a high school diploma but need the extra time.

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  8. I can sew on a button. It's ugly on the inner side but it does the trick. I fail at the rest of sewing

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    Replies
    1. Who really looks at the inner side, anyway?

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