Thursday, June 14, 2018

Blind Final


End of the year means end of the year IEPs. The special ed. teachers are busy.

The teacher of the visually impaired classes had one IEP third period. Her English student had a final to take.

Ms. D gave me the test in Braille, a typed copy of the test, and the original page (from some published book). She told me that I'd need to help Kelly with her reading.

I gave Kelly the Braille test. She put her paper into the Braille machine and we got to work. She read the first sentence...

And I understood why my assistance was required.

In case you've ever wondered, hearing a student who's visually impaired sound out words is exactly the same as hearing a sighted student's reading attempts. Although, some letter confusions were not the letters I'd expect.

She'd read the sentence. I'd nudge her towards getting the correct pronunciations. Then I'd leave her to figure out her answer, and she'd Braille it in. (So, I have no idea if she got it right or not.)

This took the entire period.

(That's why she's in special ed. If she didn't need the extra help, she'd be mainstreamed out to the regular ed. classes. They can accomodate students who are visually impaired.)

24 comments:

  1. I realize that I don't know what a braille machine is. I guess I thought she'd be reading with her fingers...?

    Hope all the testing is going well!

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    1. Yes, she does read with her fingers. The Braille machine is for her to write her answers (in Braille). It punches raised dots into thick paper.

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  2. It is good all the accommodations that are available to help all students achieve the best academic performance they can do. I would imagine it would have to have required a lot of patience on your part to help her sound out words, etc. I would be tempted to give the words but then that's why I'm not a teacher :)

    betty

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    1. Depends on the circumstance. Sometimes I just give the word. In this case she was sounding the words and getting close, so I wanted her to get there on her own.

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  3. WOW! I guess I never gave much thought to how a student who is blind would go about in regular schools. They really face a lot of handicaps in life. I'm glad your school can accommodate them.

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    1. That school takes all the students like this from the area. It's why I have those stories in the other severe special ed. classes. They've also spent time getting the regular ed. student body used to having them around so they're welcomed and not shunned.

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  4. That sounds like it would be tough for her to deal with.

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    1. She seems to be muddling through. This is why they have the specialized teachers.

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  5. I known parents who had children with special needs. And it seems they had to deal with bureaucray

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    1. Oh yea, definitely many hoops to jump through.

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  6. You do good works, my dear. Thank you for the anniversary well wishes. What did your niece choose for her birthday? I hope she enjoyed it and will be curious to learn the answer. Be well!

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    1. I do work. Not good. Just work. Thanks, though.

      Niece has not chosen anything yet. She may not get back to me for a while.

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  7. Wow! That's awesome that y'all are able to help the visually impaired. I never ran into any students like that during my schooling so it's interesting to read about them. A reminder that they do, in fact, exist. Glad you were able to help even if you don't know if her answers were correct.

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    1. They are sent to schools that have the resources for them, so that might not have been your school. It wasn't the one I went to, either.

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  8. Hi Liz - it sounds like the school is a good one to work in ... as you get to see a whole range of students, their needs and their accomplishments. And it's great the school encourages its students to accept, and get used to, kids with difficulties of varying nature = thanks for letting us know about Kelly and her Braille test - all the best Hilary

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    1. They make an effort to include these students and have the others welcome them. It makes for a more pleasant experience.

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  9. I wonder if braille would be considered a second language.

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  10. It is a challenge, I worked for the TN School for the Blind in the office and just dealing with the sight impaired in there was a challenge. Course probably easier for us since our whole school was for the blind or seeing impaired and not a special ed in a class room. Thanks for the advice Liz on moving slow however, it actually makes no difference, a flare will come on when it is ready to come on. Mine I have learned has a lot to do with the weather. Plus, all that I do, I break so much in while I am doing it. I will sit down and love on the animals or do this....my house needs some major love!

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    1. I think it would be easier for them when the school is all visually impaired, but it wouldn't help them live in the rest of the world. Whatever works, right?

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  11. Speaking of blind - have you heard of "Be my eyes", an app that connects vision impaired and seeing people in real time?

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    1. I heard something about it. Interesting idea.

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  12. I have no experience of visually impaired children learning. But I know people who work with this limitation. Thanks to their determination and technology, life is a lot easier for them.

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