Friday, September 29, 2017

That Doesn't Count


All last week, the library was having a book fair. During the morning announcements, we were invited to go over and see what they had. We were told there were lots of great books to buy...

"Who buys books?" a student asked.

It was a special ed. English class. So, I kinda knew where the question came from. But still, I was speechless.

One of the students (not the student who asked) had a one-on-one aide. The aide said what I should have said...

"I buy books."

So, I seconded, saying that I buy books, too. Of course, this didn't count.

"Yeah, well, you're teachers..."

(We spent the week reading a simplified version of The Swiss Family Robinson. I probably don't have to mention that I had a group of reluctant readers.)

35 comments:

  1. Oh, my. I like your response by having them read. This recalls the feelings I had upon learning that cursive is not always taught these days. How sad. Be well!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah, I remember hearing from a teacher friend that she didn't teach cursive to her kids. I thought, WHAT?!

      Delete
    2. It wasn't my idea to have them read. It was the lesson plan the teacher left.

      Delete
    3. Bea, cursive really isn't used anymore. Sad that we're losing it, but keyboarding is more useful for the future.

      Delete
    4. Oh, that makes sense about the lesson plan. You should have taken credit. ~grin~ As a lover of language, I'd rather see math dropped. Why do kids need that when computers are so much faster at calculations, I wonder.

      Delete
    5. But if you don't understand how math works, using computers won't help you problem solve. Math is important too. (And it is the language of science!)

      Delete
  2. I just read two YA books the kids might like better than Swiss Family Robinson:

    One Of Us Is Lying by Karen McManus

    T.H.U.G. by Angie Thomas

    Those poor kids. They have no idea what they are missing.

    ReplyDelete
  3. How sad is that. I have an actual library in my home so take that kid!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Replies
    1. Yes, it's the class in this case. There are other classes where that would not have been the reaction.

      Delete
  5. Replies
    1. If only they knew how many people disagreed with that sentiment. Maybe someday...

      Delete
  6. No wonder they don't want to read if they're given things like The Swiss Family Robinson at school. They could at least try for something from this century. Or a comic book/graphic novel.

    ReplyDelete
  7. It is so sad that technology has replaced reading. I read on my technology so I don't buy many books anymore. I can't get my teen granddaughter interested in reading at all.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Keep in mind these were special ed kids. Reading is difficult for them.

      Delete
  8. Of course not only it is good to buy books, but then to read the books one buys!

    betty

    ReplyDelete
  9. Book fairs were my favorite as a kid! My parents always had to reign in my spending. I guess I'm lucky to spend most of my time with "gifted" kids, whatever that means (rich, white?); they are always thrilled to get new books (even if some of those books are bought more for pictures and fun facts than for actual reading)!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm sure some of the kids enjoyed the book fair. Just not the ones in this class.

      Delete
  10. *Weakly raises hands* I buy books...all the time. Too many books. So many books.

    ...

    ...

    But seriously, I still own almost every book I bought as a kid at book fairs. Some of them are still my favorite too. I first bought 'Dragon Weather' from the Obsidian Chronicles when I was nine or ten and I've read it a dozen times at this point.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's sad, but it's hard to convince a kid who dislikes reading that it's fun to read. I've tried. There is a reason I don't argue the point any more.

      Delete
  11. Sad. Not surprising, but sad. On the other hand, I lived for book fairs. Alana ramblinwitham.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  12. Out of my 5 kids only one was a reader despite me reading to them all when they were little. The one who reads would read anything and everything. He has an incredible general knowledge too. The others are smart enough but they just never took to reading. It's strange. I was always lost in a book when I was a kid.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I wonder what the difference is. If we could figure that one out...

      Delete
  13. I was just going to say that I read to my kids every night and they all turned out to be avid readers....BUT according to Pinky (above) that didn't work with her. Soooo who's to know but it's a real shame that some kids don't read anymore. They miss so much.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Some kids never read. I don't think it's a "these kids today" situation. This was a special ed class.

      Delete
  14. I sigh...and face palm.
    I buy books. A LOT of books.
    And I clean toilets a dump trash for a living.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I'm choosing to believe that maybe they were asking who buys physical books, instead of e-books. I always have a hard time accepting that "I don't read," can be a complete sentence. I always expect it to be a specific genre.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sadly, it is a complete sentence for some kids. Not all kids. I see plenty of kids who do get lost in books.

      Delete
  16. Nope you are considered an adult so buying books is an OLD thing! lol...Kids now a days have the internet to read from, why buy a book? Shame, as a teen I read all the time. Not so much not but I try to read a bit each night....failing really bad with that right now.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. He just wasn't a reader. I encounter these types all the time.

      Delete
  17. There would always be kids who didn't read but I believe things are worse now. It's one of the downsides of social media, they've got non-stop entertainment and distractions. Oh for the days when there was nothing to do! I wish my teenagers would read more.

    ReplyDelete
  18. No, they don't books, because they look at their phones and play games. Grr.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Not all. I do see some students who pull out actual physical books in class when they finish their work early. There are still readers out there :)

      Delete

I appreciate your comments.

I respond to comments via email, unless your profile email is not enabled. Then, I'll reply in the comment thread. Eventually. Probably.