Thursday, February 23, 2017

300 Words


I was covering for a special ed. teacher, co-teaching several periods. 4th period I was in an 8th grade English class. The regular ed. teacher was there, and she ran the lesson as normal.

One of the things they're really stressing now is reading articles deeply and analyzing them. They had read an article on a previous day about violence in movies, and this day they were to answer some deeper level thinking questions about it.

The teacher had a whole slew of instructions. She had written them out on the board, and she spent a good ten minutes going over what she expected. There were five questions and then there was a focus question that she wanted answered in a specific format using at least 300 words.

She released them to their work, and I roamed the classroom, looking for those that needed my help. (As there was a co-teacher in there, it meant that a good portion of them were special ed. and would need a little extra assistance.) Things were going pretty smoothly.

Then I spotted a boy trying to solve his Rubik's cube. (These things are popular right now. Again.) Um, no. He had questions to answer. I glanced at his paper. His focus question had three lines of writing. That's nowhere near 300 words.

I told him to put the puzzle away. He did. He then got out his reading book...

Um, no. No, he wasn't done. I pointed out that the focus question wasn't complete. He didn't believe me.

I walked up to the board. I pointed to the words "300 words" written there. I pointed out all the myriad instructions.

"Oh, I have to do all that..."

He was not pleased.

Seriously, they just don't listen. And not just not to me.

33 comments:

  1. Obviously, the teacher meant to say 3 sentences. What teacher in their right mind would ask for 300 words? That's just insane! ;) Especially when there are more important things to do – like solving a rubik's cube!

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    1. It's almost like he has no time for the cube.

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  2. Assignment sounds a little O.C.D to me..

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    Replies
    1. It's the Common Core standards. They want things done a certain way.

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  3. Kids just can't think for themselves anymore, can they?

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  4. Rubik's Cube is back?

    My boyfriend is now a substitute teacher in a high school (where he taught full time until he reached retirement age). His chief complaint over the years has been "9th graders don't know how to listen."

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    1. For the last few years I've run into a boy or two who'll have it on his person all the time.

      They don't learn to listen until maybe junior year. Although, it depends. Some sophomores listen great, some seniors not at all.

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  5. I loved the Rubik's cube!! But I could never solve it. I am glad to know that it is ALL kids that don't listen. Not just mine!

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    1. There are websites with instructions on how to solve the thing. (And yes, all kids don't listen. I think it's in the DNA.)

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  6. *slaps forehead* Kids really don't like to listen.

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  7. Really? Rubik's cubes are back? At least it introduces some logical thinking back to today's youth. But this kid obviously wasn't being too logical about the directions for his assignment.

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    1. Rubik's Cubes have been back for a while. They're not as huge as in the '80s, but most days I'll see one student with one.

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  8. Just wait until they have to read the Driver's Ed instruction book, take the test, and then read the book again. Revenge is sweet.

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  9. No one ever listens. An annoying life lesson to learn. LOL

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  10. On the other hand, at least the Rubik's Cube is a good mental exercise, eh?

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  11. Trouble understanding directions, but likes Rubik's cubes. Seems kind of contradictory. Though 300 words sounds like a lot for eighth graders.

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  12. How cool about the Rubik Cube! I saw a display of them at the store here; now it makes sense why I did.

    Of course they never listen; they are teens :)

    betty

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  13. Ugh, enough with the Rubik's cubes.
    And enough with selective listening!

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    1. Oh, but they're fun... (Just not during lessons.)

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  14. I think this kid needs you full time. ~grin~ Your teaching talents rock.

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    1. He needs me to hover, which was my actual job that day :)

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  15. lol at least you stood firm and he understood he had to complete it the way the teacher assigned!

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    1. Yup. I think of it as a service. I made sure he didn't lose points on the assignment.

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  16. Hi Liz - listening and thinking what is meant is a challenge to so many ... Well I'm glad he settled to start answering the assignment - I still can't understand how 'we' can get away with so much ... I'm glad you helped him through. Special Ed is needed and required for so many today ... cheers HIlary

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  17. I think most people don't listen. Most of the people I deal with at work don't seem to listen.

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    1. I had the same trouble in retail, also. It's not until something comes to bite them that they learn to pay attention.

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  18. It takes, on average, 7 times to say something before the person "gets" it. This kid also just wanted to play with the cube. I'm surprised it's around!

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    1. Yeah, I'm sure he rushed through his work so he could play. That's pretty normal.

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  19. My son loved his Rubic's cube. He got really good at it in high school. Hmmmm....Alana ramblinwitham.blogspot.com

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