Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Admitting the Ploy

Campus security walked into the classroom. He had a stack of Saturday School slips.

Saturday School is a 4-hour Saturday detention. Various infractions merit this punishment such as unexcused absences, missing previous detentions, and the usual things teens get punished for.

Security called up various students. As he did that, Aaron got my attention. He mouthed, "I'm not here." So, naturally, when security called his name, I pointed him out.

Reluctantly, Aaron came up to retrieve his slip. On the way back to his desk, he threw the slip in the trash.

Yeah, I've never seen that one before (insert sarcasm font here).

After security left (after distributing five slips), Aaron explained just how he was going to get out of going to Saturday School. When he got the slip, he was directed to a list which he was to sign to acknowledge receipt of the slip. He didn't sign.

His reasoning: no one can prove he got the slip.

Which might be true. Except we saw him get the slip. And he just admitted to the adult in the room what he had done.

Aaron's not as smart as he thinks he is. If he'd said nothing, I'd have thought nothing of it. (The slip in the trash means nothing. Most of the students know when and where to report.) But by admitting this, I know that I should at least mention this in the note to his teacher.

I don't know what he gets out of this little deception, anyway. He's eventually going to have to serve the detention. If he doesn't, the punishments get harsher.

Today's A to Z Challenge post brought to you by the letter...



Do you think he got away with it? Did you ever try to get out of a detention?

17 comments:

  1. Yikes! You know I have a hard time seeing how people can be forced to fill a Saturday detention, especially if they don't have transportation back and forth. I understand the reasoning, but as a parent I'm thinking I'd say no to bringing my son or daughter in on the weekend. Then again, I suppose my kid probably wouldn't be in detention. I don't know. I guess this is one area where I just look at the public school system, shrug, and am glad we've gone our separate ways.

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  2. Hi Liz! Aaron's story would make a great scene in a book. Hmm....now you have me thinking :).
    Shells–Tales–Sails

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  3. Not very clever but certainly cunning!

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  4. Yes, denying everything means it didn't happen. Genius.

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  5. lol, got to admire his effort though, but yes, not thinking ahead much. Great post and welcome to A to Z 2014

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  6. I've worked with students with various behavioral issues in the past. I can relate to your post. I hope that he doesn't 'get away' with it, because then what is he learning? If he did not sign, then the security officer should sign that he gave the slip to the student, then have another adult in the room that witnessed the event sign as well. It has been my experience as well, while not all parents appreciate or participate, that if they are notified in advance as well it helps - especially since you know the student will not inform his parent(s). This way they can schedule transportation and they know what to expect. While Aaron seems very non compliant, there are consequences to behavior and even as adults, we experience this. Hopefully it all works out for Aaron - detention's no fun. If I was his parent (depending on his age) I would rent The Breakfast Club (lol) and let him watch it. Things could be worse Aaron...

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    1. I'm sure that's what the security guy did.

      The school calls home for important things, and they have the "parent portal" online where parents can check up on their child's grades, his absences, et al. So, eventually, the parents will hear of this.

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  7. Well, isn't that a typical teen thing to do! Daring but not very sensible!

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    1. Ah yes, typical is what I get all day long...

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  8. Life has a way of teaching subtly- if not immediately then down the road. Hopefully he'll eventually realize that daring but not sensible doesn't really pay off.

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  9. Ah, yes, I remember those days of having more bravado than brains.

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    1. I look forward to they day they grow out of it. Unfortunately, that usually happens after graduation.

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  10. I was a good girl and an excellent student and never got detention. Appearing to follow the rules is a much better way to manipulate the system. For example, I completed all my classwork but rarely attended class as a senior. Were there attendance rules? Absolutely, but respect and a good GPA put me above them. This kid needs to think things out better.

    VR Barkowski

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  11. Welcome Liz to the A to Z Challenge! Kids have to be called out. They have to learn to respect adults. Can't let the inmates rule the asylum.

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