Friday, May 30, 2014

Not a Permanent Move

It was the beginning of the period. I did my usual intro and checked the roll. But something wasn't quite right.

"Is everyone in their assigned seats?" I asked.

Several students replied no. Not about them. About the two boys sitting in the back of the room in seats that did not have names attached in the seating chart. I glared at them expectantly.

"But you let us sit here yesterday."

7th graders...

The previous day, they had been working on a project. The boys hadn't brought colored pencils (even though they knew they would need them), so they shared with a boy in the back of the room. I didn't so much "allow" them to sit there as I didn't protest when they did.

But that was the previous day. With a different assignment. This day...

(Don't they realize that I can't learn all their names in a day? And I was just about to mark them absent?)

This is why I don't allow them to move from their assigned seats normally. It's hard enough keeping track of all of them. Add in them moving around the room...

16 comments:

  1. No, they don't realize those kind of things. They think, "hey, I got away with this yesterday, I can totally do it again today!"

    I subbed a couple of times at the school where I used to teach. They sent me into the classroom with a physical description of each kid. Of course, I'm guessing our class sizes were much, much smaller than what you're dealing with.

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  2. I volunteered at Field Day today for my 6th grader. 2 girls, who I thought looked VERY mature - but c'mon! these days I can't tell! Anyway, we had enough watermelons to give everyone 2-3 slices. Fair enough - it was a snack. The first 3 or 4 classes were so pleasant. Then it got hotter and hotter outside and the kids got less pleasant - or maybe we just go hotter and crankier - who knows? They knew they got 2 slices. But they kept coming back for more. And when we said no, they would bargain. Or plead. Or whine. Or wait til one of us ran to get another watermelon to cut and try and sneak one. One little boy kept changing hats with other kids trying to scam me. I was done. So when these 2 girls came up, I asked them, as I asked everyone - is this your first or second slice. They gave me attitude. No answer, just attitude and a hip jut. I took a deep breath, looked away, looked back and said, "I'm sorry, how many slices have you had?" More attitude. Then a mumble. "I'm sorry, I couldn't hear you." More attitude. Then a barely audible (with attitude and a sneer) we haven't had any...... So I smiled again and said "Great, do you want one or two slices?" and they gave me more attitude. No words, just an attitude. I said..."so????? none?????" and turned away to help someone else. At this point I noticed they had visitor badges on. They were adults - sort of. Maybe volunteers from the high school - but what is wrong with people? I just wanted to scream. Then they came back and tried to be all sweet to me to get watermelon. It was hot and I am nicer than I wish I was - so I gave them some - but did they really think after that I wouldn't remember them? UGH!

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    1. Been there... Well, not for a field day, but giving in even with attitude. Sigh.

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  3. It's part of the mindset where no one ever realizes that rules can change from day to day. Plus they have to try to get away with it. It's like the law or something.

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  4. We just re-learned in our office that rules are so very important. Something got sent out without having followed proper protocol. The receiving party was understanding, but this could've been a law suit, so there had to be a meeting about ... rules. Kids have to learn that early on. Good post, Liz. Always enjoy your school stories, and I feel for you. :)

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    1. Kids don't get that we have rules for a reason. Not until something bites them in the butt...

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  5. When I used to go on field trips with the kids when they were younger, I'd always be constantly counting the kids I got assigned to make sure no one strayed (even though I only had about five or so). I could see myself doing the same thing in the classroom, though it would be a harder number to keep up with. Now I see one advantage of assigned seating, of course when one is a student, they would prefer to sit just about anywhere they want.

    betty

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  6. I always leave instructions for my relief teacher never to let them move seats. It's taken me an entire term to strategize where each student should sit and who they SHOULD NOT sit next to. If the balance is out chaos ensues! Of course if there is group work they have to move but I would never leave anything that nerve wracking for my substitute :)

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    1. Most teachers do give that instruction. The students have figured out every way to get around it, though.

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  7. I always wondered why we had to have assigned seating in school. I think I always assumed it was to keep people from causing trouble, but now I know the truth!

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    1. Oh yeah. It's so the subs can figure out who is who.

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  8. Assigned seating certainly makes sense. I love the excuse - “But, you let us sit here yesterday.” And you know perhaps in their mind they legitimately believed that if it was okay yesterday, why wouldn’t it be okay the next day? Nah, they were just testing you.

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  9. I understand the need to keep certain students apart, and I absolutely understand the necessity for a seating chart, particularly for a substitute. But when I was in school, they always sat us alphabetically, which never made a lot of sense to me. Still doesn't, really.

    VR Barkowski

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  10. There are as many as forty students in an average high school class in Japan, and I usually taught 6 to 8 different classes a year. I couldn't have survived without seating charts.

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    1. I don't know how any teacher does survive without one.

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  11. Oh this brings back memories but I was a good girl and always sat in my assigned seat

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