Friday, March 22, 2019

Reading the Clock


I was scheduled to go to the continuation high school for day two of a two-day assignment. I got a call in the morning telling me that they had to pull me. There were not enough subs to go around so I was being sent to...

Elementary school.

I was not happy about this.

(I avoid elementary school for various reasons. They know this. I was not given a choice.)

But none of this was the fault of the elementary school staff or the students. And the fifth grade class wasn't too terrible.

We were midway through their math assignment. A student asked how long until recess.

I pointed out the clock...

Frequently in the middle school and sometimes in the high school when I point out the clock, the kiddos inform me that they "can't read" it. And I grumble and sigh. They seem to be perfectly content not knowing how to read an analog clock.

No, I don't help them out with this. They can figure it out.

So, when the fifth graders asked how long until recess, I figured we could go over clock reading.

The clock on the front wall was set up for learning to read a clock. (I'd think they learned that younger--I recall it being part of the curriculum in second grade--but I know from experience that they don't.) The teacher had posted the minutes on the outside.

I asked when recess was. They knew and said. I asked what time it was. I took a volunteer. We read the time off the clock. The student managed it. And then I had them subtract...

They were able to figure it out.

And now I know what I'm going to do next time a student informs me they can't read the clock on the wall, whether it be in middle school or high school. If they don't know their elementary school lessons, we can go over them again...

23 comments:

  1. That's weird to me that someone wouldn't know how to read that kind of a clock by high school.

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    1. It is weird. But they insist they can't read it and must pull out their cell phones to see the digital readout of the time. Hence the reason why they "can't read" an analog clock.

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  2. You know, I'll have to check with my step grand daughter who is in 8th grade. Now that I think of it, she might not be able to read a clock either. Good skill to have.

    Do you get paid the same whether you work at elementary school or the upper grades?

    betty

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  3. Well, digital clocks are easier and everywhere. It's the kind of thing that happens.

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  4. I remember learning how to read a clock in 2nd grade. Another skill not being taught anymore....

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    1. It's being taught. It's just not being reinforced either at home or just out and about when the kiddos don't try to read the time off of clocks.

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  5. You nailed it! Now, we need to teach children how to tie their shoes and read long hand/cursive writing.

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    1. I know they are still teaching cursive, but the kiddos aren't pushing themselves to read it.

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  6. Oh, it's a great idea to go over how to read a clock. Are you telling me that the middle school and high school kids don't carry cell phones? Just curious.

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  7. The desire to know when break is, I would think, would compel the kiddos to figure out how to read a clock!

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    1. You'd think. But too often someone just answers the question. "How long until recess?" "10 minutes."

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  8. Good for you, Liz. Technology has its downside. Can kids say what time a quarter to or 15 minutes after is?

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  9. I know 20-somethings who never figured out an analog clock. Some argue there's no need in this day when so many check the time on their cell phones.

    I don't understand such helplessness.

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    1. Sad to say, but I look forward to the day when those people come up against an instance where their ignorance gets them into trouble.

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  10. Interesting! I guess the only time I read analog clocks is at the gym or pool. Huh...

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    1. Yeah, we don't use them that much any more. But they're out there.

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  11. I bought the Barbarians analog wall clocks for their bedrooms when they were young. And their first watches were analog. In fact, it is only now they are in high school they are allowed watches that have both analog and digital times on them. But it's been worth it as they both can tell time with no issue.

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  12. Oh my....I remember those learn the time deals. Me learning and teaching the kids....and grandson. Fun times. Problem is with the digital age most clocks in the home don't have hands anymore. Just like going to the store, the register tells the kids how much change to give back but the company don't teach them to count it back. I think that should be part of giving the money back. I learned to count it back.

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  13. There things my parents learn in school and I never did.
    I wonder what my grand children will learn.
    Coffee is on

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  14. This was sort of an eye-opener for me, Liz -- in this digital age, reading an analogue clock might be a great challenge, even at middle school. I remember how my father taught me to read the clock at a very young age.

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    Replies
    1. Scary the stuff that future generations lose.

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  15. That's really just crazy to me. I could see one now and again if a learning disability of some sort but so many not knowing how..goodness.

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