Wednesday, September 14, 2016

Rant


The class was Intro to Health Careers. I've covered it before. Although, not so early in the school year.

Normally, they'd be working on modules, but due to an unexpected and harsh cold (it laid her flat for a week plus), the teacher had not had a chance to get them started. So, the assignments were a bit different than what I'd expect.

This particular day (I covered the class for three days) they were posed two questions. How do vaccines work? Do vaccines cause autism? To find the answer, they were to search online. Then they were to write up their answers, with at least a paragraph of explanation per question.

Fifth period. While every other student jumped on Google, Samantha immediately opened a Word doc and started typing.

Eventually, she filled a page. Curious, I ambled over and asked the obvious question. "Already know the answer?"

"Yes," she said. "I got into a rant, though. I'm not sure if that's allowed."

So, I read what she wrote. To "check".

Her description was well written. She compared how vaccines work to athletic training or dance classes. It was clear she understood the underlying mechanisms. The rant was saved for question number two.

As far as rants go, hers was rather tame. She mentioned a Reddit post, ignorance, and previously rare diseases becoming more prevalent. I didn't think she'd gone too far, especially considering that the teacher had pretty much asked them to take sides in this.

It's heartening to see well-informed students. It isn't as rare as it may seem from this blog. (The well-behaved and intelligent students rarely make appearances here, mostly because the other students are funnier to write about.)

33 comments:

  1. She'd already done her research and knew her stuff. Admire her passion.

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  2. Yay for her already doing her research on topics like this :)

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    1. She may have just been paying attention in previous classes, too.

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  3. Whether I agree with her or not (I haven't a clue), the fact that she took this issue seriously is very impressive. Bravo.

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  4. I had wondered if perhaps she had a personal take about vaccines and autism, i.e., family member that might have been affected by it. Seemed like an intelligent young woman!

    betty

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  5. Always good to have confirmation that there are still well-informed students out there.

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  6. Immediately when I read the students' task, my heart dropped. Google research? for a topic like that? Doesn't your school have access to an online encyclopedia and/or professional articles for this type of research? *sigh* I sincerely hope the type of research the kids are doing and where they are doing is an oversight by a sick teacher and not an insinuation or expectation that the internet has all of the "correct" answers. 😕 What these students find during their "research" could really affect the way they handle vaccinations for their children years (or not so many) down the road!

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    1. It was a "defend your answer" assignment, and I was there to steer them in the right direction. As in, "check to make sure your source is reputable". Many found their way to the CDC website and similar.

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    2. Thank goodness for CDC!

      My SIL was dealing with this issue recently, with my nephew, and she was considering taking the all-natural approach. My husband, a science geek/computer engineer who actually works to develop devices that can read heart and brain cells, ended up freaking out. So this topic hits close to home. :)

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    3. Too bad she's not into homeopathy. Then you could argue that vaccines are homeopathy. Which they are.

      I mean, it's a fairly "natural" way to deal with diseases. You're training the immune system to recognize virulent pathogens by introducing them into the system. What's more natural than having your body fight off the disease?

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  7. Smart girl! I like her. She should get an A+++.

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  8. She had her research at her finger tips :)

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  9. Research papers aren't what they used to be. But this student did well it sounds like!

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    1. I wouldn't call it a "research paper". It was a 2-paragraph classwork assignment.

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  10. Yay! There's hope for the future, eh?

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  11. I commend this student for taking it seriously and doing her best to find out information. I'm one who believes that it does not cause autism and it's so wrong not to have your kids vaccinated.

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  12. It's honestly just reassuring. When I saw the question and heard the immediate response, I was terrified to hear what she had to say.

    Pleasantly surprised that she was well informed.

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    1. Some of them are. Some of the conversations they have are fascinating. I jump in when their facts are incorrect, and many times I don't have to say a word.

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  13. Good for her! And I am pleased to read from your commentators too.

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  14. Apparently, this was a subject she was passionate about. Passion and emotion generally effortlessly motivate me.
    Personally, I would like to see more of this type of story from you :)

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  15. You may have a future Nobel Prize winner in your class. I don't exaggerate; I went to a high school for those talented in the sciences. (How I made it in there, I have no idea, but whatever). And I agree with the commenter who said she would like to see more of this type of story. Good for your student! You made my day. Alana ramblinwitham.blogspot.com

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  16. Great to hear she has her feet planted on the ground and has the right opinion.

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    1. Yes, it's nice when they have the facts.

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