Wednesday, August 3, 2016

Logistics, Part 2


The prior week, I had covered a health class for summer school. Originally I had been contacted to cover the Monday. Then Tuesday through Friday was added. And then the last four days of summer school, the following week from Monday through Thursday, was added as well.

Needless to say, this was not a planned thing, and I wish Mr. C all the best.

They were covering the full semester health class in about five weeks, four hours per day. Which meant that they flew through chapters. And chapter tests.

But going through the chapters this quickly meant that the students didn't have study time to prepare for tests. To make up for this, the teacher allowed open book tests, but just for the first few minutes of the test.

Which, of course, the students didn't think was long enough.

This day they were taking three chapter tests together. Multiple choice and true/false. They'd get fifteen minutes of open book time.

They complained that he gave them ten minutes per test of open book time before. So, they should get longer, they protested.

One girl said that they should take each test individually.

I could see what she said, but I couldn't do this due to the logistics of passing out and collecting tests. Did they take one test, wait for everyone to finish, and then pass out the next test? Or, was I supposed to give the next test when someone finished the first? Which then would mean that each student was on a different five minutes of open book time.

How was I supposed to coordinate all of this?

The girl complained of my use of the term "logistics".

"Do you mean 'logically'?" she asked.

Um, no, "logistics" is the term I meant.

But clearly I was misspeaking because "logistics" isn't a word, and it makes no sense anyway. Couldn't I just give them more open book time? Or pass out each test separately?

This is why I've stopped trying to explain things to teenagers. Sometimes it's like arguing with a brick wall. Although, a brick wall has more give.

I passed out all the tests at the same time, but I did give them five minute warnings. I could, at least, do that for them.

23 comments:

  1. Teenagers will just argue with you anyway.

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  2. Someone once said that arguing with teenagers is like nailing jello to a tree. About sums it up.

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    1. I like that. I'm going to steal it.

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  3. They argue just because they can!!

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  4. That's what teenagers do. Seems like you handled things well.

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    1. Thanks. You have teens of your own, so I bet you've seen more than me of this.

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  5. I can't believe she didn't know what logistics meant. I'm sure at some point someone her age will confirm that it's a real word and then she'll believe it.

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  6. They would have argued with you anyway unless you said yes more open book time lol

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    1. They would have argued then, too. 20 minutes? Can't we have 30...?

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  7. Hehe, this gave me the giggles and I had to giggle quietly since my colleague is with a client.

    I didn't answer yesterday because I couldn't quite fathom the question. Good thing. I hate to be your next brick wall! ;)

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    1. Tuesday's question was awful. That's what happens when I'm out of ideas...

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  8. I realize why children give me hives. I'm still reading my eighties era diaries and amazed I survived. Best wishes to you, my dear!

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    1. This wasn't all of them. Just one vocal girl.

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    2. Honestly, one vocal kid would drive me up the wall. You are a saint. Thank you for shaping young minds with your gifts.

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  9. I like how you say a brick wall has more "give" than teenagers. It made me lol. It sounds like you did what the teacher told you to do; it's not your fault he didn't allow them "enough" open book time. How difficult were these tests anyway? I feel like health class when I was in middle/high school was practically a joke.

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    1. They were multiple choice & true/false. But, they were going through a chapter a day. They didn't have any study time to absorb the material.

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  10. That seems like a whirlwind of a class to get everything done in just a few weeks. I think you were fair to give them the 5 minute warning.

    betty

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  11. Ah the logic of the teens! They are always right. They are never wrong, cos that's what everyone else is.

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    1. I see you are familiar with teens.

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  12. Oh, if I know me, I would want open book for the whole time:) I was one who always blanked out when it came to tests. They do try every avenue to keep the books open. I can't help but think of my clients who will argue with me and try to negotiate that they can do our payment program when they are a $1,000 in the hole each month because their housing costs are too high. I have to tell them to sell their home but they will try every which way to tell me they can afford it meanwhile 95%. Of their income is going to the mortgage and utilities

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    1. Some people will argue as long as they draw breath.

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