Thursday, May 26, 2016

Where You At?


Last week, I talked about Alec not being able to log into Odyssey to do his assignments. I thought it went without saying, but some of the comments made me rethink my position. Alec did not forget his birthday. He was trying to get out of doing anything by playing at not being able to log in. Little did he realize that I'm the type of sub who will find a way...

One of the issues with Odyssey is that it "locks out" the students periodically. It's either the "test" assignment or the student has to redo something before they can move on. This is not a big deal for the teacher, as she can just go in and fix the issue so the students can continue working.

However, when there's a sub who doesn't have access, the students can get "locked out" and be stuck. For an entire period (or, in this case, two). Which is bad news for the sub, as the students tend to get into mischief when they have nothing to occupy their time.

Earlier this school year, Ms. R taught me how to override many of the lockouts. So, when the students actually got to work and found the usual issues, I went to work making sure they could continue (and not slip onto slither.io).

In the second hour (they have her for two periods), the lockouts started to mysteriously disappear. Ms. R, in her lesson plan, had said she'd clear things from home, but when she wasn't doing that in the first hour, I did. When I realized that she was doing that, I logged off.

Alec was flummoxed, though. It was clear Ms. R was doing this, as she was sending all the students messages (telling them what they got wrong so they could fix it).

Alec demanded to know where she was. I told him to ask her. So, he typed in: wya

Me: Does she know what that means?

Alec: Probably not.

Me: Then you'd better explain.

Alec (typing): where you at

Ms. R (message): At home. Sick.

The next day, I saw Ms. R, and we discussed the class. She told me she had planned on clearing out the Odyssey lockouts, but she fell asleep and didn't wake until the second hour. Then we got to Alec.

I was right. She had no idea what "wya" meant. She only responded because he clarified. For some reason, she was impressed that I had been standing over him during that whole exchange.

This is when she told me that Alec had turned in a lot of assignments that day. So, apparently once he gets started, he makes progress.

I learned something important that day (for the next time I cover these classes): the password to log them into Odyssey is the same password they use to log them onto the computer. (So, since Alec could get on the computer, he was totally faking not knowing his password for Odyssey.)

19 comments:

  1. You have to be one step ahead of them at all times, sounds like you are. I am betting Alec won't pull this on you again if you are subbing in a class he is in.

    Betty

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Let's hope. But now, I'll know their passwords if anyone else tries to pull this.

      Delete
  2. You and the teacher were both on top of things. Rather rude he'd demand to know where she was. She should've typed NOYB - none of your business.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Well that's a handy thing for you to know. I'm surprised the teacher responded even with clarification - clearly not an English teacher!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. She has taught English. She was more amused by his question than offended.

      Delete
  4. I would not have answered his question! None of his business!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. She was more of the mindset of, "I'm sick. Where else would I be but at home?"

      Delete
  5. Seems like kind of an annoying system if it periodically locks students out. Especially students who will jump at the chance to avoid doing work!

    ReplyDelete
  6. It seems silly that the program periodically locks kids out. This is a school – not a bank. It's kind of cool that Alec was able to talk to his teacher through the program. Wonder if it made him feel double watched that day? :)

    Somebody should tell the kids that there is a camera in the room and their teacher can see and hear everything they are doing! It'd be fun watching them squirm! Although I'm not sure if they'd believe it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Some are convinced there is a camera in there. It doesn't change their behavior. As for the lockouts, I believe it has to do with how many times they've attempted the assignment. It's to prevent cheating.

      Delete
  7. Alex, Alex, Alex!!! Good for you staying on top of things! And good for Alex for actually doing something!
    Barbara, blogging at Life & Faith in Caneyhead

    ReplyDelete
  8. In a lot way school kids don't change over the generation. A few sub we played all sort of jokes. Nothing mean.
    When the word "Odyssey" I think of the story.
    Coffee is on

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yup. That's why subs know what's coming--we've been on the other side. I don't think kiddos realize...

      Delete
  9. I couldn't do what you do. I would be reading a book for all the kids to see called "a thousand ways to die". I would have told that kid to write in the proper manner even "Where You At?" sounds like a demand and it is just wrong

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's texting speak. That's why he went there initially, because he wasn't thinking that he was talking to a teacher. If he used "wya" with his friends, they would know what he meant.

      Although, I want that book! I would so take that out and read it in front of them. The looks I'd get...

      Delete
  10. Replies
    1. It's like, dude, we're old people. We don't know the newfangled acronyms.

      Delete
  11. I bet sometimes you yearn for the old chalk and BB. This sounds tricky.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well, that's the advantage of subbing. I haven't seen him since this incident.

      Delete

I appreciate your comments.

I respond to comments via email, unless your profile email is not enabled. Then, I'll reply in the comment thread. Eventually. Probably.