Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Not Staying Here

This week it's my turn at Unicorn Bell. I'm discussing weekly bloghops you may be unfamiliar with. I'd love it if you'd stop by and say hi.


English class. At the continuation high school. They had a paragraph to write in response to an article they read. As per normal, some worked while others... well... they had the work out on their desks...

"...When you're in the back of a police car, you know they drive all like..." and he mimicked sliding from side to side.

The four boys discussed not-the-assignment in a volume more appropriate for a busy restaurant. The stuff they discussed... Cops and not giving cops information. Getting arrested. Drugs.

I informed them that they had an assignment. That they were talking too much. Too loudly. That they needed to get on task. Which they ignored. Even while I stood there, hovering.

The next day, I had these classes again. Their teacher, who was nearby at a meeting/training/whatever, was there setting up before the school day, and we discussed how things went. Harrison and his group were well known to her. Considering how little attention they paid to my instructions, she thought it'd be a good idea to have them "work" elsewhere. In the principal's office.

The class arrived. Of the four boys, two were absent. One sat away from Harrison (the loudest of the group). And Harrison found another boy (who I had had in a different class and I knew to be just as loud and obnoxious as Harrison) to sit next to.

I got class started. Which Harrison ignored. He was up and walking around. Talking loudly to the other boy. Talking over my instructions to the rest of the class.

Once the rest of the class was settled with the assignment for the day, I had time to deal with Harrison. I approached. I explained that he was to take his stuff and go and work in the principal's office for the period. (As the other boy was at least making a pretense of working, I decided to let him be.)

He wasn't having it. Oh, he howled. I "hadn't warned him". It "wasn't fair". They "weren't doing anything wrong". He refused to budge.

Well, I wasn't letting him stay in class. I could tell that this day would be a repeat of the previous one. And I didn't want to hear any of it.

So, I explained he had a choice. He could go, now. Or I could call the principal and have him escort Harrison out. And I wasn't bluffing. I would have done it.

But Harrison finally relented. And left.

Ah, the peace. It was lovely. The rest of the class got really, really quiet (even though I wasn't concerned if there was a little talking).

Harrison did return a couple times. To ask questions. About the assignment. It was clear from what I saw that he was actually making progress. Which was more than he had done the previous day.

So, success. Sort of. At least, I hope he got his work done.

16 comments:

  1. So bored in the principal's office that he decided to work?

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  2. I'd never like to be a principal!

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  3. Sometimes they just need a heavy hand. Way to stick to your guns.

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  4. Maybe without the distractions of other people around, he had no choice but to do his work.

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  5. Very inappropriate talk for a classroom too. What is it with kids these days?

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    1. First we must consider the location. That particular school attracts the kids who would be more likely to have those sorts of conversations.

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  6. Well at least he was working on the assignment, maybe next time he'll decide to obey the class rules and actually get to stay in class!

    betty

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    1. That would certainly be nice. Not likely, but nice.

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  7. Why do they always refuse to go? Gah! I always say that too. "If you don't go of your own accord I'll ring the office and have someone come and help you there". Works every time!

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    1. They do it when I'm just moving their seat. Every little thing some of them have to battle.

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  8. It seems as though it would take less effort to do the assignment than to fight it, but I guess that's just me. A great lesson in accountability for him!

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    1. You'd think, right? But they will fight it tooth and nail.

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  9. I don't know how you do it Liz. I wouldn't have the patience! You are a good woman!

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    1. Nah, I'm not. When things like this happen, I just know I've got material for the blog.

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  10. You have to count those small successes. And mean what you say!

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  11. Harrison would rather be with you than at the principal's office. I'm glad the other kid left...I wonder if he went to the office or just skipped out?

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