Wednesday, November 11, 2015

Should Have Hid From This One


"I'll just run straight home."

...was the only thing I heard from some conversation at the back of the room. My mind immediately went to earthquake evacuation, and needing to explain why he should remain on campus in such a situation (because a missing student will be looked for), I approached the group. And learned that that was not what they were talking about.

You know what they say about assuming things...

Now I was in the conversation. About what they would do if there was a school shooting. *deep sigh*

This is not the sort of conversation I want to encourage. I don't want to give anyone any ideas. I don't want to scare them. But one of the girls was telling the others about a "riot" at her old school. Which turned into a conversation about what they would do in that situation. Because they're teens.

(Teens tend to be pretty self absorbed. Things tend to be all about them. Try it sometime. Start talking to a teen. See how fast they turn any topic into a definition of themselves.)

So, it turned out the boy was right. Because I remembered seeing a video about what to do in such a situation, and running is the right thing to do.

I managed to find the video for you...



I should mention that this was a high school class. Spanish 2. So, at minimum, they were sophomores. But many were juniors and seniors. (Age wise, that's a minimum of 15 up to age 17.) It would have been a whole different scenario if they had been, like, 12.

The conversation turned to something else shortly after this, so I went back to the front of the room. Only to have a girl call me over. Upset.

When the period started, she had exited the room in tears. For what reason, I have no idea. But now she was barely holding it together again. She asked if she could step out because the conversation the others were having upset her.

*another deep sigh*

I knew not stopping that conversation was going slap me upside the head.

In my defense, I thought they were mature enough to handle the topic. And they really should have some idea what to do if faced with the situation. I didn't start it. I didn't contribute to it (other than mentioning run, hide, and fight). And it ended fairly quickly.

I let the girl step out of class.

And when I saw the teacher at the end of the day, I made sure to tell her all about it. Because one must be careful. (It wasn't like anyone was threatening anything. Just discussing what to do if faced with the situation.)

I love to hear all the sorts of things they talk about. But that can turn on me with no warning.

20 comments:

  1. It's frustrating to me that this is a type of conversation kids have--not because they shouldn't, but because our society has devolved to the point where it's a valid discussion.

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  2. I'm surprised this girl was so upset by the conversation. I guess it's something kids worry about, though.

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    1. I can't be sure that's what upset her. She was upset about something earlier, too. Whatever it was, it was reported to her teacher.

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  3. Things that we just didn't have to deal with when we were kids. But it's a reality for them.
    Maybe that girl was just really sheltered at home?

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  4. I watched the video; great advice on it! I always told son when he was in high school if he heard popping sounds to run away from them, not towards them. Sad we have to have these types of conversations in the first place.

    betty

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    1. Yes, it would be a much nicer world if we didn't have to consider these things in the first place.

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  5. Considering how many mass shootings there are, I'm not surprised that this is a topic of conversation. That's what happens when you live in a place where guns are everywhere.

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  6. I remember a few years ago, after a school shooting somewhere in our great nation, my granddaughter was telling us that they had talked at her school and were told by the teachers that if they heard shooting they were to get under a desk or somewhere and hide. Her dad, my son, who is a deputy sheriff told her...."Do not hide! Get out the window and run as fast as you can away from the school. Do not hide!" At the time I thought he was nuts. But now that is what they are teaching them. Run, don't hide! Only hide if you cannot run from the building! Thanks for sharing this video. I have not seen it before. I will share it with my kids!

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    1. I think it's an important video. I probably would have been one to hide before seeing it. Now I know to run if possible.

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  7. Oh yes. I've almost been in trouble for showing kids a film about all that rubbish floating in the Pacific Ocean because some students started crying over the dead birds.J E Oneil is right. We are fortunate in Australia we don't have guns.

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    1. Before showing any sort of video that might be controversial, most teachers cover their rears and send home permission slips to be signed by the parents.

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  8. It breaks my heart that they need to have this conversation. When I was a child, we had the air raid drills where we ducked under our desks...it was scary, but this feels much more real and possible in the world we're in.

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    1. Yeah, not happy that they need to have the conversation, but if it comes up, I'd rather they get the right information.

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  9. It's a shame that this is a topic they discuss. I wouldn't have known anything like this when i was in school. I don't trust kids and they can say things under their breath-maybe she has been a victim of bullying. They knew how to upset her and so they did by scaring the hell out of her. I have been a victim of bullying and kids are very devious and can say things with a teacher right beside them and the teacher doesn't notice. They are then told better not say anything or else so the victim clams up

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  10. I worked in a school in inner London where there was a special siren for classroom lockdowns. There was lockdown practice, same as fire drill. I wasn't there for long, just didn't have the stomach for it.

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    1. No siren for us. Just an announcement over the PA.

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  11. In April of 2009, an active shooter situation unfolded in walking distance from where I work - 14 people killed, including the shooter. After that we gave thought to "what would I do here at work if he had walked in here?" but my employer has never held a drill, never spoke to us about what to do. In the wake of what happened in Paris, we all should think about this. I am sharing your post. Alana ramblinwitham.blogspot.com

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    1. Share the video. I found that it had great information, which is one of the reasons I embedded it. I had no idea how prescient this post would end up being.

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  12. It's sad it's a topic that comes up, but good that they're able to be prepared. I have to show this video to hubby. He has given me so many things to read about what to do because of where I work. I don't think he knows about the video.

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